Free Course: A Review – Internet of Everything (IoE)

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During my short break between Open University modules, I decided to do one of the OU’s free courses on OpenLearn. As I have a mind towards the web, I chose to do the Internet of Everything (IoE), which was listed as an introductory level science, maths & technology course. The general blurb seemed interesting enough, and it made the course sound like something that would keep my interest….

The internet of everything (IoE) is the networked connection of people, process, data and things. As more people, data and things come online, we develop processes to harness the vast amounts information being generated by all these connected people and things. The goal of this free course is to introduce fundamental concepts and technologies that enable the IoE.

[OpenLearn]

My studying of it didn’t go completely to plan, as I decided to start my second set of proper university modules as soon as the module websites opened, which truncated my free time rather. Still, I persevered, and shoe-horned in the alleged 15 hours worth of studying time. My stubbornness paid off, and I passed the course. I’m not sure what my overall grade was, but I passed each section’s test with results of over 80% (despite one question in the final assessment quiz being duff, and asking me for two answers when only one was correct).

Week 1: What is the IoE? – quiz score 87%
Week 2: Pillars of the IoE – quiz score 80%
Week 3: Connecting the unconnected – quiz score 97%
Week 4: Transitioning to the IoE – quiz score 90%
Week 5: Bringing it all together – quiz score 86%
Final assessment quiz score 87%

Anyway, with the course done and dusted, I have a few gripes/warnings to make for anyone else considering undertaking it.

First off, it took longer than 15 hours. There’s a lot of technical detail and waffle in this course, and I’m sure getting through it took me twice as long as it was supposed to. Which is saying something, as I usually breeze through OpenLearn courses in less time than they state it should take.

This brings me to my second gripe, which is, although the blurb says it’s an introductory-level course, I would disagree. Coming at it with computer knowledge already in hand (like I did, having just completed an ICT module) is a good idea if you want to better understand the material when it goes into TCP/IPs, gateways, security, and the like. Otherwise, the module text may come across a bit more technical than you’re prepared for.

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Thirdly, although it’s listed as a STEM-type course, in a lot of places it feels more ‘business management’ in its wording, and because of that tone, I did get bogged down and bored in places. The overall tone of the course was probably down to the people who were responsible for creating it, which leads me to my final complaint…. The course is a collaboration between The Open University and Cisco Systems, which means the material provided comes across as a protracted advert for Cisco Systems at times.

Despite these issues, at the end of the course I did feel as though I understood better what the IoE meant (it’s different to the IoT, but includes the IoT), and how it can be integrated into our lives and businesses, but I doubt I’ll be drawing on this knowledge in the future.

So, in summary, if you have a bit ICT knowledge to hand, and want to know more about what the IoE is, how it’s being implemented, and what it means for businesses in the future, then you may want to consider this course. However, be prepared for a lot of business-type waffle, and be aware that the course may take you longer to work through than it states. The test quizzes are no walk in the park either, so be prepared to actually re-read the material before doing them.

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Pumpkins and Pass Marks

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Another one of those posts that’s just a couple of smaller topics mushed together.

First up, I got my results back for my TU100 (My Digital Life) module, and I’m more than happy with the results, having passed it with a distinction. Initially, my score was a more than respectable…

Overall Examinable Score: 94%
Overall Continuous Assessment Score: 86%
Result: Distinction

But the next day I got an email saying they’d miscalculated my score. *Dun dun dun…!* However, this turned out to be good news, as they’d failed to take into account my online-exam, and my overall continuous assessment score (OCAS) went up to 90%!

I must say, I’m genuinely surprised by my OES score. I was expecting it to be in the 80’s. One of the questions asked me to write a couple of pieces of text as if applying for a job, which considering I’m still unemployed, I figured I’d do badly at. There were also some calculations I had to do, and while the maths was simple, last time I did calculations in a TMA I lost marks for layout. I also had to do some argument mapping, which I sucked the big one at during the practice goes in the module. All in all, I was positive I’d lose major marks over these, yet I managed to get 94%. Unfortunately, you don’t get the marked version of the final assessments back, so I have no idea what I rocked, and what I could’ve done better at, which sucks. Now all I have to do is keep this momentum up for the next five-and-a-half-years. Easy! *ahem*

October ended with good ol’ Halloween. Me being me, I gutted and carved a pumpkin, nearly crippling my hand in the process.

The guts I used to make soup, which allowed me to use up the last 2 bottles of utterly disgusting BrewDog’s Nanny State (vegan and alcohol-free) IPA I had. I’d bought the stuff as something different to drink on a Saturday night, but I didn’t make it through the first bottle. Ugh, it was too bitter and so rank! So, I veganised this Pumpkin Soup with Beer and Cheese recipe, using Oatly Cream in place of whole milk, and Tesco’s vegan Jalapeno And Chilli Cheese. The result was passable. The bitterness of the beer still came through (tbh, I doubt anything short of a nuclear explosion could eradicate that stuff’s taste), but the soup’s overall creaminess helped reduce the gag factor.

The seeds I roasted…or rather, I burnt to a crisp. Honestly, it’s a toss of the coin as to whether I get them right. So far, I’ve only ever once managed to cook them okay, and that time was not this year. So into the recycling they went.

So that’s all that done for another year. Not long to go now till Yule!

Choosing a New Path at the OU

Recently, I was mooching about the Open University’s revamped study pages, when I stumbled across a widget that lets you plan out your future module choices. This got me thinking more in-depth about what path I wanted to follow.

monitor-1307227_1280As I’ve said before, I’m doing an Open Degree, which gives me plenty of flexibility, but I’ve chosen to follow, more or less, the Computer Science route, but with the two Creative Writing modules thrown in. But the question was, what Computer Science route? The OU provides lots of different ICT modules. Some big (60 points), like the now dearly departed My Digital Life (TU100) was, and others small (30 points), like Technologies in Practice (TM129) is. Luckily I had a vague notion of what I was interested in, namely web page design, and as it happens, the OU has a path for that.

For the Open Degree, the OU helpfully provides lots of different study plans based on possible routes of interest, as (and speaking from experience) choosing what to do when given free module reign can be fairly daunting and confusing. I happened to have a bit more of a direction in mind, as I wanted to make a bespoke degree that would help me with web communications, but I still wasn’t sure what modules to do. However, one of the routes created by the OU happens to be Web Development…

This route provides an insight into the internet technologies required to design and create web, cloud and mobile applications and services together with an appreciation of both technical and business perspectives. [OU website]

Stumbling across this has made me completely rethink what I was going to study in the second year. I had planned on doing Communication and Information Technologies (TM255), which (while it contains the word communications) focuses more on data sharing, wireless networks, online collaboration and the like, which, if I’m honest, wasn’t really the path I wanted to take. But thanks to the route map, I’ve shifted focus, and plan to do two half-modules in its place, namely Object-Oriented Java Programming (M250) and Web Technologies (TT284). This, in turn, led me to think about my third-year modules, and given that some of the modules I want to take will be ending during my duration of study, I had to plan carefully what I wanted to take and when.

Subsequently, I made a thing…..

Year/ Term Course no. Course title Size Oct – year May/June -year
1b TM129 Technologies in practice 30 2017 2018
L185 English for academic purposes online 30 2017 2018
2a TT284 Web technologies 30 2018 2019
M250 Object-oriented Java programming 30 2018 2019
2b A215 Creative writing 60 2019 2020
3a A363 Advanced creative writing 60 2020 2021
3b TM356 or TM352 Interaction design and the user experience 30 2021 2022
Web, mobile and cloud technologies 30 2021 2022
TM470 The computing and IT project 30 2021/2* 2022/3*

*I May have to wait until I complete the previous IT module, or I may be able to start it at the same time

I’m undecided between TM356 and TM352, but I should have a better idea of things once I’ve done the second year modules. TM356 has an exam as part of its marking process, and I don’t do well in exams. Being able to do coursework, and having time to consider my answers, is way better for me. Conversely, TM356 ends in a project, which is a bit impractical, seeing as my final module is also a project. Which means, if I do the modules simultaneously, I’ll be having to work on two projects simultaneously (unless I can do the same project for both). It’s a lot to think about, but thankfully I have a few years to go before I have to make a hard and fast decision.

Plus, during the holiday between the first and second year, I can do a free Java course to prep myself.

Actually, doing all this has got me quite excited for my future studies. Knowing what I want to study, and when it’s coming up, has got me quite invigorated. Kinda makes me sad it takes so long to complete a module, and then wait for the next to start.

Semester Two at the OU

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So my materials for my next Open University modules have finally arrived, and considering I’m doing two modules this semester, I’m really rather gutted with what turned up, or rather, the lack of what turned up.

Now, the modules are half what TU100 My Digital Life was, i.e. TU100 was a 60 point module, whereas these two are 30 points apiece, but still. With TU100 I got lots of books, plus the senseboard. With L185 English for Academic Purposes Online, I got a single resources book of test text. All the rest of the module is online, and not even in epub form, which is a bit naff.

TM129 Technologies in Practice has given me marginally more, and with the long-awaited I Robot novel I received a Windows Networking Essentials textbook, and a DVD of James May’s Big Ideas: Man-Machine. But I’m rather peeved that I get no textbooks on robotics, as that was the main topic that made me pick the module, but at least I can download all the online material as epubs for easier reading and future reference. Also, the DVD is a bit of a cop-out. Not because the subject matter is crap (I watched it the other night and quite enjoyed it), but because my mate has exactly the same video, as part of a box set that he got from The Works (a cheapo UK arts/crafts/bookstore), which meant it probably cost him less than a fiver, meaning the single DVD likely only cost him a quid or two.

I get that the OU can keep their fees low by producing less printed material, but like I said, I find it rather disappointing. However, I should count myself lucky. As I live in Wales, my university fees are a third what they would be if I lived in England, so I can only imagine how hard-done-by my fellow English students may be feeling.

Anyway, despondence aside, I have decided to crack on. The term doesn’t officially start until October 7th, but as all the material is live on the website, I figured I may as well get ahead. Especially as I’m having to juggle two modules, and you never know what’s around the corner disruption-wise. That and I couldn’t wait to learn about robots!

Summer of Code, aka Computer Says, “No”

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So I thought I’d test myself with the Open University’s Summer of Code. Each day, a new problem is set, requiring participants to write a script to solve it. It’s mainly for transitioning second to third years, but as I’ve done a bit of coding in my spare time in the past (using Python) I thought I’d give it a shot.

For my uni course, I’ve been using Sense to do assignment scripts, though not by choice. Sense is a basic programming language using command ‘blocks’, as opposed to having to write out the commands yourself. The OU uses this programming language to teach coding. Sense is ok, but it does ignore certain principles that Python uses, such as the first character in a string in Sense is at position 1, not 0 as it is in Python. It’s also pretty limiting … as I was to find out.

I managed, with a few hiccups, to do the first two day’s tasks using Sense. However, the third task highlighted how basic Sense is. There’s no easy way to convert from letters to the equivalent alphabet numbers. Or rather, not without using a hell of a lot of if-elseif-else blocks that would grind my laptop to a halt. It also didn’t help that it took me half an hour to actually figure out what the problem entailed, as it was written in a rather unclear fashion. After two hours of struggling, and realising I’d left my Python course notes several 100 miles away in Amsterdam, I had to give up. I was rather irked, to say the least. Especially, considering I’d aced the previous two tasks.

Day four wasn’t much better, but by this point, I was getting the impression it was because the questions were overly complicated, rather than the coding itself. If I couldn’t figure out how to do them on paper, how was I expected to do them in code? The tasks were supposed to take two hours to solve, but most of that time was taken up with me going, “WTF??” It also didn’t help that the questions would sometimes have mistakes in their convoluted explanations, making things even less clear.

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I gave myself a break from day 5, and tried afresh on day 6. This time, I did progress a little further in answering the question than I had the previous couple of days, but again, I got stymied, so I decided to call quits on the whole thing.

It wasn’t an entirely defeatist move. As it is, I’m also doing a free Open Learn badged course on “English: skills for learning“, which is designed to help “develop the English reading and writing skills needed to succeed” with university work. As I have my final module assignment to do (it’s a doozy), and as one of my next modules will be “English for academic purposes online” I prioritised, and figured out of the two time-sinks, learning how to write a proper assignment was more important than goofing around with unintelligible questions, and contrary scripts.

The past week or so has also made me realise I’ve pretty much forgotten all the Python I’d learnt. Though, in fairness, I haven’t touched the language since 2015. So it looks like I’m going to have to shoe-horn in some refresher learning. Codecademy do a lot of free programming courses, and I’ve already covered jQuery, HTML, CSS and Java with them. However, I did my Python with Coursera (when it used to be a good MOOC provider), which means I can do some Python refresher with Codecademy. I just need to find the time!

A Second Life in Second Life

So I’ve recently done a section on virtual worlds in my Open University module (My Digital Life), and a lot of it was about the use of Second Life in the realms of education, business and pleasure. It got me thinking and intrigued about the place again. Many years ago I tried logging in, but my old PC simply couldn’t handle it, and my foray into the world died before it even started.

By the end of the section, I had succumbed to curiosity. Armed with my more powerful Linux laptop, I signed up again, got a new avatar, and I entered the world at the OU’s remaining island (Deep Think).

I didn’t meet anybody while I was there, which was probably a good thing. It gave me a chance to wander round and get a feel of the place undisturbed. But more importantly, I had major problems using the edit avatar menu, and on several occasions I inadvertently ended up butt naked. Being alone certainly saved my avatar’s blushes.

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I’ve called my cat Mor’du

After my wander, I went and visited the International Space Flight Museum, which was actually pretty cool.

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I went back a couple of times, mainly to tweak my avatar’s look. I also visited another museum, namely the Museum of Natural History of Vienna, where I looked at dinosaurs, and managed to get trapped under the floor. But again, I didn’t see anyone else.

Do I think I’ll be going back to Second Life? Probably not. But it’s handy having an avatar if a get-together is ever on the cards.

Decisions Decisions

The time finally arrived for me to choose my second lot of modules for my Open University degree, something that I’d been waiting excitedly for.

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As you may know, I chose to do the Open Degree, basically to give myself a bit more flexibility in the modules I can choose, and I’m basically doing Information and Computing Technology combined with Creative Writing. Sort of an ICT major, Writing minor kinda deal. I’m still in the midst of doing ‘My Digital Life’, which, though a little outdated (it’s the last time it’s running), I’ve found to be interesting and informative, but I had 60 credits left to fill, to complete what will technically be my first year of study. And so, choices had to be made.

Since beginning this degree, I’ve already known one of the other first year modules I wanted to take, which is ‘English for Academic Purposes Online’, and which’ll be my first languages module. But at 30 credits, this left me having to decide on another 30-pointer, which wasn’t easy. I didn’t want to learn a language, or retail management, or delve into essential mathematics. This left me with two options:

  1. An introductory statistics module.
  2. A module delving into robotics, networking and Linux.

The sensible part of my brain told me to do statistics. After all, I’m a scientist, and if I ever manage to get a science-based job, statistics may well be needed. The other part of my brain said, “But robots!” As I was having trouble deciding, I put some feelers out to my social media followers, asking what they’d do. To be honest, the masses weren’t much help. My Twitter poll got one vote, for robots, and my Facebook post got one comment, again for robots. However, the FB post was the clincher, as they basically said I could do a statistics course anytime, and thinking about it, they’re right. I’m sure if I did a Google search now, I could find any number of free statistics MOOCS online. So, with that in mind, I’ve chosen ‘Technologies in Practice’ as my third first-year module.

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These choices mean I also know what type of degree I’ll end up getting in six year’s time. My second and third years will be split 50:50 between computing and language modules, but my first is going to be split 75:25 between computing and language modules. Meaning the majority of my modules will be science ones, therefore, my final degree will be a BSc. Woo, another science degree!

As an aside, did you know the first year Open University modules don’t count to the final pass mark? I didn’t! I’ve been busting my hump to try and keep my overall grade for TU100 within distinction level, panicking whenever I’ve got a low(ish) mark, only to find I’m stress over nothing. Basically, I just need to get a passing grade to make it to the second year. Still, I guess it shows I’m making an effort, and setting my personal bar high.

But robots! Yay!